HowTo: Use lxbdplayer – the Open Source Blu-Ray Disc player for Linux

Tutorials
Yes, you read that right - there is finally an Open Source Blu-Ray Disc player GUI for Linux, albeit unofficial and certainly very grey in legality depending on which country you are in. lxbdplayer is the collaborative effort of four French Engineering students. What they have written is basically a frontend that combines the apps DumpHD and AACSKeys which I have used in previous Blu-Ray articles into one easy to use GUI. Decrypted BD streams are then piped into MPlayer for playback. The end result is that you can now watch your BD movies almost as simply as a regular video player without the need to go through the process of ripping them into an MKV file first, or chewing up loads of drive space. (more…)
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HowTo: Rip a Blu-ray movie using an LG GGC-H20L Blu-ray drive with Ubuntu

Tutorials
The Blu-ray disc format has brought with it the ability to easily provide the next generation of High-Definition 1080p movie content. There's just one problem - Ubuntu and Linux in general has no official support for Blu-ray, and its encryption scheme is vastly different to that of DVD - it's not just a simple case of installing a library like the libdvdcss2 library for decrypting DVD's - the protection is done both at a software and hardware level. This article discusses how I used my recently purchased LG GGC-H20L Blu-ray ROM drive to successfully read and watch movies using Ubuntu Intrepid. (more…)
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HowTo: Rip a DVD video title into an x264 and Ogg encoded MKV video file

Tutorials
Many people like myself jumped aboard the revolution that was the DVD ten years ago (has it already been that long??) and collected a vast library of discs that now take up space on several shelves in the corner of your lounge room. In this day and age of the PVR and DVR, even I myself find it frustrating to go to the shelf, find the movie I want to watch, take the disc out, make sure it's free of fingerprints, stick it in the drive, skip all the blasted "mandatory" ads and trailers before you can actually get to the movie itself. At least with YouTube and downloaded AVI and MPEG files, you can simply double-click and watch what you want, when you want, on demand, 24/7 - no…
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